Saturday, June 09, 2007

From The Library

I am addicted to books. And the library. I especially like that I can order books through interlibrary loan without any extra travelling for me. Before getting into my current reads and a review or two, allow me to get on my soapbox for just a moment.

Thank you so much to the mayor of Bridgewater and the local government who believe that a new, bigger, much needed library should remain a LOW priority for the indefinite future. I appreciate your decision SO MUCH that I hope your vehicles and office air conditioning give out completely and are unrepairable during this summer's most definite heat wave; to the same effect I hope that this winter, when we are dumped on by one severe snow storm after another, your very expensive snow blowers will refuse to blow snow and your computers go on strike. Because to me, all those excesses that you can't live without are really LOW priority in my life, and I hope you suffer, as your constituents suffer without the promised new library! Thanks again.


Ok. I'm done.


The Contrary Farmer by Gene Logsdon. Brilliant. I put off reading the last chapter just so I wouldn't be "done" with it so fast. I want my own copy. Now. So I can highlight specific sections for quick reference in the future. Very informative. Contrary in the face of big agribusiness and their government hand-outs. Teaching how to live on small acreage and still provide for family and livestock, and survive without going broke. Couple points of dissatisfaction: spelling mistakes, and in the later part of the book when the author admits to using non-organic methods to spot control specific weeds or pests before they spread out of control. It could be that I assumed that the author condemned any use of herbicides or pesticides, etc, without coming right out and saying so.


Dante's The Divine Comedy. I am reading Inferno, about three quarters done. It's a wonderful read. I always considered it to be a too difficult a read for me, since I did not attend college or university. I was quite wrong. I am not sure how many different translations there are, but this one by C.H. Sisson is smooth and intelligible. Contemplating my past actions is slowing down this read with ponderings of which circle I would be found in.

Slip-Stitch Knitting is one of the InterLibrary Loans I was quite enthusiastic to get my hands on. However, I am quite disappointed with this book as a whole. The only saving grace is that I didn't spend any money on it.
This book was published by Interweave Press in 1998, whose track record leaves something to be desired. I found the author wordy, the charts silly and the samples sloppy. At the very least they should have been blocked to even out their appearance and show some pride in workmanship.

2 comments:

AliP said...

You need to hit up The Bulletin for a job as book critic. You are very good!

Holly said...

Haven't you noticed that decisions on libraries are made by those whose remote control is fused to their hand?

Which circle? As long as it does not involve your work magically being frogged so that you are always knitting in the same place....

If anyone is interested in slip-stich knitting, there is by far better information found in the Barbara Walker book on Mosiac Knitting (which is what this technique is usually called).